Buy Day of Reckoning

January 30, 2009 · Filed Under books · Comment 

Day of Reckoning is a romantic thriller that describes the real-life panic and world famine that will occur when food supplies are reduced. At present it is a novel, but the worrying truth is that it could easily become a reality.

Based on the findings of years of careful research, the novel shows how after a series of disasters America’s economy collapses and law and order breaks down. Farmers are unable to harvest their crops or plant for the following year; trucks can’t make food deliveries; ordinary citizens have no heating and are reduced to shopping with guns; and the old and weak begin to die of hypothermia.

At last, governments around the world accept something must be done about food security. But it is too late. Catastrophe seems inevitable. Thousands, if not millions will die around the globe…

Then the head of the CIA requests an urgent meeting. There is one man who just may be able to help.

The plan is to make all or parts of Day of Reckoning available as both a free podcast and download. Watch this space…

Famine in the West Printed Book

January 30, 2009 · Filed Under books · 1 Comment 

Imagine it’s the year 2025 

People in New York and London are starving to death. There is anarchy on the streets of Paris and Rome. Millions in the Pacific and Asia are dying from flood and hurricane. Everywhere people FINALLY agree that something must be done about food security.  But it is too late. 6 billion people will starve.

Unless…

Famine in the West explains what needs to be done and why. It is essential reading for anyone who wants to safeguard the future of their children and grandchildren.

Written by a Yorkshire Farmer, this controversial new book describes how the West will soon depend on the Middle East and Russia for its food in the sense that the oil and gas so essential for food production will come from there.

Reviews    

  

    Jonathon Porritt and David Richardson quotes
    Jonathon Porritt and David Richardson quotes 

 

The price for the E version is £6.49 + PP. You can pay:

  •  on line via paypal account or credit card
  • by cheque   

If you would prefer an E copyof the book at £2.99 click here

You can pay:

 
UK buyers £6.49 + £1.49 p+p = £7.98 UK buyers £6.49 + £1.49 p+p = £7.98


European buyers £6.49 + £2.99 p+p = £9.48


Rest of the World buyers £6.49 + £4.39 postage = £10.88


 What you are buying

The book has the cover/ jacket shown above and is:

  • 234mm x 156mm in size with a 10mm spine
  • 126 pages long
  • softback
  • 32, 162 words long
  • 3 parts and 20 chapters

It will be sent to you the day after payment has cleared

Buy Famine in the West Ebook

January 29, 2009 · Filed Under books · Comment 

Imagine it’s the year 2025 

People in New York and London are starving to death. There is anarchy on the streets of Paris and Rome. Millions in the Pacific and Asia are dying from flood and hurricane. Everywhere people FINALLY agree that something must be done about food security.  But it is too late. 6 billion people will starve.

Unless…

Famine in the West explains what needs to be done and why. It is essential reading for anyone who wants to safeguard the future of their children and grandchildren.

Written by a Yorkshire Farmer, this controversial new book describes how the West will soon depend on the Middle East and Russia for its food in the sense that the oil and gas so essential for food production will come from there.

Reviews    

 

 

 

    Jonathon Porritt and David Richardson quotes
    Jonathon Porritt and David Richardson quotes 

 

The price for the E version is £2.99. You can pay:

  •  on line via paypal account or credit card
  • by cheque   
 
 


  • 32,000 word Ebook
  • PDF that automatically opens in Adobe Reader which you can download for freeon line via paypal account or credit card
  • sent to you via email within 48 hours of purchase

If you would prefer a printed copy of the book click here

What you are buying:   

Pesticide Ban – will Food Production be hit?

January 17, 2009 · Filed Under news · Comment 

In the European Parliament this week, MEPs voted overwhelmingly in favour of proposals that could mean the removal of up to 23% of current pesticides. Defra Secretary Hilary Benn reiterated that he could not support a regulation that could devastate European productivity.

There are fears that the new rules could remove substances that tackle critical plant diseases such as blight in potatoes or septoria in wheat leading to big yield reductions before suitable replacement sprays are developed. Production of crops such as carrots and onions may become very difficult as important weed killers are withdrawn and large scale hand weeding is now out of the question.

This highlights the way that over the last 60 years or so, the carrying capacity of the Earth has been raised by the use of pesticides, fertilisers and engine power derived from finite fossil fuels. Many people would like to see these artificial aids to production withdrawn, but we are now dependent on them for the vast amount of food needed.

In the past, fossil energy has been so cheap and plentiful that we have been able to use it to provide food energy cheaply. When fossil energy becomes expensive and scarce through depletion or through geo-political events, then food will also become expensive and scarce.

We therefore need to find better ways to collect and use the abundant supplies of solar energy that reach us every day.

What is Peak Oil?

January 17, 2009 · Filed Under termninology · Comment 

Peak Oil is sometimes called ‘Hubbert’s Peak.’ Marrion King Hubbert, a Shell geologist predicted in 1956 that US oil production would peak around 1971. His prediction was not believed by the U.S government or even by most other prominent geologists and oil companies, but he turned out to be correct. He said that production in the U.S would follow a bell shaped curve, rising steeply, reaching a peak in 1971 and then falling.

Hubbert also predicted that world production would follow a similar pattern. Many geologists and oil experts have in the last few years concluded that he was correct in that too, and indeed in many other countries, especially high consumption countries, production is already declining, leaving us more dependent on the Middle East.

When North Sea production went in to decline in 1999, the oil companies and the UK government seemed to have been taken by surprise. They had not predicted such an early peak and were reluctant to admit it had actually happened.

There are gigantic amounts of oil left, but when world oil production reaches its highest level ever, a level never to be repeated and to be followed by a decline, a mad scramble will begin and panic will prevail simply because we cannot manage with less in the face of rapidly increasing demand from Asia, especially China and India.

There are many different estimates of when Peak Oil will happen, mainly because it is impossible to get accurate reserve figures from producing countries, especially OPEC members who are thought to have lied for years about their reserves in order to have a high production quota.

Some experts think we are at or near to peak already and point to the fact that very high prices during the last few years have not led to big production increases as would be expected. Other experts think that around 2010 is the most likely time while others think it could be more then 20 years away.

What is not in dispute is that oil and gas are finite resources and will peak at some time. We need to be urgently working on ways to allow food production to continue when the peak arrives.

The solutions section of the book, Famine in the West, describes my thoughts on how this can be done. What are your thoughts?

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